Complete Fiction of W. M. Spackman

Complete Fiction of W M Spackman Described by Stanley Elkin as this country s best kept literary secret and a lost American classic W M Spackman is one of the finest writers of the twentieth century This omnibus edition includes all

  • Title: Complete Fiction of W. M. Spackman
  • Author: William Mode Spackman Steven Moore
  • ISBN: 9781564781376
  • Page: 219
  • Format: Paperback
  • Described by Stanley Elkin as this country s best kept literary secret and a lost American classic, W M Spackman is one of the finest writers of the twentieth century.This omnibus edition includes all five of the author s previously published novels Heyday and here presented with revisions the author made shortly before his death and the critically acclaimed noDescribed by Stanley Elkin as this country s best kept literary secret and a lost American classic, W M Spackman is one of the finest writers of the twentieth century.This omnibus edition includes all five of the author s previously published novels Heyday and here presented with revisions the author made shortly before his death and the critically acclaimed novels published between 1978 and 1985 An Armful of Warm Girl 1978 , A Presence with Secrets 1980 , A Difference of Design 1983 , and A Little Decorum, for Once 1985 The novel As I Sauntered Out, One Midcentury Morning is published here for the first time, as well as the author s only two short stories.

    • ✓ Complete Fiction of W. M. Spackman || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ William Mode Spackman Steven Moore
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      Posted by:William Mode Spackman Steven Moore
      Published :2019-08-03T21:15:27+00:00

    2 thoughts on “Complete Fiction of W. M. Spackman

    1. William Mode Spackman Steven Moore Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Complete Fiction of W. M. Spackman book, this is one of the most wanted William Mode Spackman Steven Moore author readers around the world.

    2. I was wandering through the Literature section of a local bookstore sometime in the late 90s, looking at the "usual suspects" (Amis, Davies, Borges, Powell, and so on), really just checking out their selection, not expecting to find anything new, when I thought: "I'll bet I can stump them. Let's see if they have any W. M. Spackman!". Spackman is one of my secret pleasures: a rather little-known writer, born in 1905, died 1990, who published 5 novels, _Heyday_ in the early '50s, then 4 very short [...]

    3. I first heard about this author from Rich Horton. Now that I think of it, I’ve only heard about this author from Rich, but the buildup that Rich gave him forced me to pick up the Dalkey Archive complete collection of his works. I’m not very familiar with the Dalkey Archive, but from what I can tell, they are a non-profit or collective determined to keep worthy literature in print in inexpensive editions, mostly trade paperback (the name of the press is from a novel by Flann O’Brien). Spack [...]

    4. "Spack" was my literary mentor. It is a great pity that so few people have read this book. It's true that Spackman was of another era, but he was a great literary stylist, a winner of the Vursall Award when it meant something, when style wasn't confused with showing off. He was also very funny. And he was published by Knopf.Spackman isn't for everyone. The title of one of his novels is An Armful of Warm Girl. Enough said. But his women are certainly less silly than his men. His fiction is for pl [...]

    5. I have only read An Armful of Warm Girl so far, not the entire book, so my review only reflects that. I would say I'm not quite so enthusiastic as some reviewers, and I'd say it's quite generous to compare Spackman to Faulkner, but there is much to say about this author. Spackman has a very unique style, a way with words, and a vocabulary that is unmatched. The fact that he can use words like "hagiolatrous", "apodeictic", and "ullaged" without sounding like some sophomore with a thesaurus and to [...]

    6. It took 30 or so pages to really click for me, but there's real joy in Spackman's language. It's this odd, classical Ivy League vernacular, but not in some putting on airs manner. It seems an honest language. There's a way these sentences seem to roll out almost plainly in his tongue, wild as they are.

    7. Re-reading Spackman was a joy! Although his short pieces and his last novel were not quite as delicious as his Presence, Difference and Little Decorum, his three really great novels, still worth reading indeed - such a prose stylist!

    8. Stylist fiction from a man who didn't publish until very late in life. Unfailingly unique sentences and dialogue.

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