The Lizard Eaters

The Lizard Eaters It seems incredible that in the Jet and Electronics Age there should still be living in Australia people who have no contact whatever with our civilisation people who had never seen white faces had ne

  • Title: The Lizard Eaters
  • Author: Douglas Lockwood
  • ISBN: 9780727000040
  • Page: 334
  • Format: Paperback
  • It seems incredible that in the Jet and Electronics Age there should still be living in Australia people who have no contact whatever with our civilisation people who had never seen white faces had never seen their own face in a mirror or been close to a motor vehicle of any kind.Form many years there has been rumours of such a lost tribe of aborigines in the vastIt seems incredible that in the Jet and Electronics Age there should still be living in Australia people who have no contact whatever with our civilisation people who had never seen white faces had never seen their own face in a mirror or been close to a motor vehicle of any kind.Form many years there has been rumours of such a lost tribe of aborigines in the vast deserts of Central Australia, but generally they were treated as fantasy.The fact of their existence was confirmed in recent years by officers from the Welfare Branch of the Northern Territory Administration who began patrolling the Gibson and Great Sandy Deserts in 1957 They found Pintubi tribesmen who had never been in touch with our way of life.In 1963 the Melbourne Herald s correspondent Douglas Lockwood was invited to join a patrol into the Gibson Desert Here he tells the fascinating story of that journey and the discovery of yet Tintubi people perhaps the most primitive tribesmen remaining on Earth.

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      Posted by:Douglas Lockwood
      Published :2019-04-22T04:38:13+00:00

    2 thoughts on “The Lizard Eaters

    1. Douglas Lockwood Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Lizard Eaters book, this is one of the most wanted Douglas Lockwood author readers around the world.

    2. This is an older book, so it's language is tricky to understand sometimes. I enjoyed the primitiveness and how they made do with what they had. I enjoyed reading Douglas's description of the Aborigines he encountered along the way and tried to help, or did he?I probably wouldn't read this book again, but since we are heading to this area later this year I was interested in reading the (now outdated) views on the country.

    3. The book, which was published in Australia in 1964, presented a fascinating picture of life among an extraordinarily isolated group of Aborigines. These people had lived in the driest terrain in the country for hundreds of years. They had never seen Europeans until the 20th century. Nomads, they lived in family units, trudging across the desert in search of sandy water holes, lizards, and occasional small kangaroos.

    4. I enjoyed reading this account of Lockwood's encounter with the Pintubi people. It was interesting to learn about these secluded people and how they managed to survive for many years in the harsh environment of the Gibson Desert. His style of writing is easy to read.

    5. Fantastic story, unbelievable but true. Fascinating descriptions of the country, the people, how they lived, what they saw (and what we don't see).

    6. An interesting tale of the contact in the 1960s with one of the last groups of Aborigines still living their traditional life in the Gibson Desert.

    7. I picked this up in the airport and read it on the flight from Melbourne to Los Angeles. It was a fascinating account of extremely primitive Aborigines living in the Gibson Desert. The author was invited on an expedition to locate people in 1963. Many were malnourished because of the extended drought. In one case, Lockwood was the first White man a group had ever seen. These are (were) probably the most primitive people on earth.I did find Lockwood's point of view interesting. While recognizing [...]

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