Ain't You Glad You Joined the Republicans? A Short History of the GOP

Ain t You Glad You Joined the Republicans A Short History of the GOP Chock full of period illustrations political cartoons and GOP memorabilia Batchelor s fast paced adventure of a party and a people encompasses one and a half centuries of Republican battle and para

  • Title: Ain't You Glad You Joined the Republicans? A Short History of the GOP
  • Author: John Calvin Batchelor
  • ISBN: 9780805032673
  • Page: 387
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Chock full of period illustrations, political cartoons, and GOP memorabilia, Batchelor s fast paced adventure of a party and a people encompasses one and a half centuries of Republican battle and paradox From Lincoln to Teddy Roosevelt to Nixon, Reagan, and Gingrich, this book provides a must read for the millions of Party stalwarts.

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      Posted by:John Calvin Batchelor
      Published :2019-06-01T12:34:28+00:00

    2 thoughts on “Ain't You Glad You Joined the Republicans? A Short History of the GOP

    1. John Calvin Batchelor Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Ain't You Glad You Joined the Republicans? A Short History of the GOP book, this is one of the most wanted John Calvin Batchelor author readers around the world.

    2. I was a disgruntled ex-Libertarian Party member when I got drawn into a Republican campaign, still skeptical and wary about the party--I started there out of loyalty to a candidate for convention delegate I personally knew. (I mean I came from a working-class Puerto Rican Democratic family--what do you expect? Republicans all had horns and cloven feet! I knew it!). So several people in that campaign became family, and one of them gave me this as a gift at the end of the campaign as a sort of a " [...]

    3. I heard John Batchelor (the author) interviewed on NPR back in 1995, in the wake of the Republican recapture of Congress. He made some interesting points about how, in the flush of success, the Republicans should look to their founding ideals - antislavery, freedom of the individual, sense of nationhood - as an antidote to potential hubris. Unfortunately, this book was not as interesting as that interview. There is very little fleshing out of those GOP founding ideals. Instead, this is mostly ab [...]

    4. This is one of those books where, as soon as the history reaches what the author can remember, he stops consulting sources, leading to errors. It's been ten years since I've read it, but I seem to remember the author thinking James Danforth Quayle's name is Daniel James Quayle, or something like that. It makes you wonder how much of the other stuff isn't true, either.

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