Why You Lose at Chess: Second Edition

Why You Lose at Chess Second Edition This updated chess classic demonstrates how to learn from your losses by recognizing the warning signs as they develop and by analyzing games gone wrong In addition to expert analysis of each stage of

  • Title: Why You Lose at Chess: Second Edition
  • Author: Tim Harding
  • ISBN: 9780486413723
  • Page: 227
  • Format: Paperback
  • This updated chess classic demonstrates how to learn from your losses by recognizing the warning signs as they develop and by analyzing games gone wrong In addition to expert analysis of each stage of the game, this guide offers insights into why players lose from good positions as well as weak ones, and how the pressures of time can be a problem The change from traditioThis updated chess classic demonstrates how to learn from your losses by recognizing the warning signs as they develop and by analyzing games gone wrong In addition to expert analysis of each stage of the game, this guide offers insights into why players lose from good positions as well as weak ones, and how the pressures of time can be a problem The change from traditional correspondence chess to forms of play based on email and the Internet is examined, along with the intricacies of computer chess and the ways in which practice with computers can benefit players from novice to grandmaster.To demonstrate that blunders occur at all levels of play, author Tim Harding profiles his own most instructive loss as well as similar losses by three International Masters He also presents a fascinating analysis of the famous face off between Gary Kasparov and IBM s chess playing supercomputer, Deep Blue.

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      Posted by:Tim Harding
      Published :2019-09-12T05:14:54+00:00

    2 thoughts on “Why You Lose at Chess: Second Edition

    1. Timothy David Harding was born in London in 1948, and started playing competitive chess while at school After reading Politics, Philosophy and Economics at Oxford, he was caught up in the Bobby Fischer boom and started playing chess at a quite high level and writing on the game mostly under the byline T D Harding Tim s latest book Eminent Victorian Chess Players Ten Biographies was published in February and he is now researching a detailed work on one of its subjects, J H Blackburne In 1976 Tim moved to Dublin, Ireland, where he worked in various literary capacities He played on the Irish team at the 1984 Chess Olympiad in Thessaloniki, Greece, and earned the title of Senior International Master of Correspondence Chess From 1996 2005 Tim edited the magazine Chess Mail but became increasingly interested in the history of the game, which has been the subject of his recent books In 2009 Trinity College Dublin awarded Tim the degree of PhD at for his dissertation on chess history and he works there as a part time tutor in modern European history His book Correspondence Chess in Britain and Ireland, 1824 1987 , which expanded on some aspects of his dissertation, was shortlisted for the English Chess Federation s Book of the Year award in 2011 Some of his articles can be read online at chessmail.Four of Tim s earlier books are still in print and he is considering launching e books of some of them.Since completing his doctorate, Tim has also been developing an historical project on links between Ireland and Burma Myanmar, the country where his mother was born, and he expects to publish on this subject in two or three years.

    2. In my case because I was crap! Good title considering that. One of the many chess books I spent my hard earned on that I got a little way into and gave up on as they made not an iota of difference to me in my short lived pursuit of trying to be what I was in truth never going to be.

    3. Somewhat depressing title, but actually a well written piece. My chess game improved significantly after reading it.

    4. This book is okay. The author describes many reasons for losing the game. Some of the games are instructive.

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